Go Back   Family Vacation Critic Forums > Family Vacation Planning, Tips & Ideas > Interests & Activities > Family Road Trips & Cross-Country Travel
 


Forgot Your Password?

Family Road Trips & Cross-Country Travel Get vacation tips exclusively for families, from families.
Family Car Travel Tips

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-15-2009, 07:24 AM
Rae6's Avatar
Rae6 Rae6 is offline
Family Adventurer
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 20
Default Repositioning of RV's

I have always wanted to drive an RV across the country from the south (where I live) to the west coast, traveling the route 66 like the show that is mentioned in the other thread. I however cannot afford to buy and maintain a RV

Last year I did a little research and learned that many RV dealers/companies do respositioning just like cruise ships. There are many deep discounts and free mileage. These are usually done 2 times a year- spring/fall. You can find deals for RV's for around $20-$25/day for the unit and free mileage of up to 3000 miles. They have a specific location to take the RV and a time to be there, but you can do it both ways across the country.

If you are like me and want to explore our great land with just a road map keep your eye out. Here is a link of just one of many of the sites to look out for:

http://www.cruiseamerica.com/rent/hot_deals/

Anyone else, thought of doing this.
Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-25-2009, 11:38 AM
TheRoadScholar TheRoadScholar is offline
Family Adventurer
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 6
Default

I have rented from CruiseAmerica before and found it easy. I did not know they did one-way drop-offs like this, so thanks for the tip!
Reply With Quote

  #3  
Old 09-29-2009, 12:35 AM
Rancher Dave's Avatar
Rancher Dave Rancher Dave is offline
Family Trekker
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Houston, TX & Swiss Alp, TX
Posts: 305
Default

Going one way, with an open jaw airline ticket is a great way to see a lot more things on vacation as well. We got to tour the Southwest US and visit Vegas, Disneyland, and Four Corners all in a week and that would not have been possible had we driven from home out and back. (We used the car not the RV which serves now as my ranch house. The same principal still applies.)

Using an RV for an extended trip can really help cut some costs...breakfast of cereal served up in the RV, staying in the RV, etc...can really help cut some costs otherwise associated with the travel. Admit gas will cost more since you will use more of it on the trip. Extra space for 1000s of miles in the vehicle can really make for a much nicer trip as well.

Another tip for traveling when you are in areas where watching scenery is not important...get up and drive between 2am and 8am and you will avoid a lot of the traffic (watch for drunks though) allowing more time enjoying yourself when you arrive where you are going. If packing out of an RV park that early, be kind to the neighbors and try to avoid making lots of noise while leaving.
__________________
I love traveling. I've been to Dinsey at all different times of the year with Christmas being my favorite. I've been to six continents and hope to very soon visit Antarctica. Australia and Fiji are among my all time favorite foreign destinations.

Probably the most notable trip was October 2002, when we were at Bali the night of the first bombing there. *** You will find me on Cruise Critic as well with the same user name. Happy Travels to all!!!

Watch a quick look at my Christmas Light Displayhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBS34hUQrpM




Past Trips (Most recent first):
Aug09 WDW Week; June-July09 RCCL AK Cruise, Vegas, Grand Canyon, Disney Land and Four Corners region; Apr09 RCCL Voyager of the Seas; Feb09 RCCL Mariner of the Seas; Dec08-Jan09 Voyager of the Seas; Oct98 Fiji's Matangi Resort; May-June85 UK & France vacation; many others before these.

Reply With Quote

  #4  
Old 08-05-2010, 07:43 PM
RandyP RandyP is offline
Family Adventurer
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 15
Default

We did a one-way repo from Iowa to Alaska for one of the rental companies and it was awesome. Our three year-old had a blast and we got a bargain.
Reply With Quote

  #5  
Old 08-08-2010, 11:59 PM
HostColleen's Avatar
HostColleen HostColleen is offline
Host & Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 481
Question

Hi RandyP,

How about sharing some details of what you saw, did and experienced on your way from IA to AK? Our members and I would love to hear about what this long journey's drive was like as it must have been truly amazing!

Where'd you stop? What was memorable? Best food? Weirdest moment?
Funniest moment? Most unexpected thing was.....?

Please share some of your stories with us - road trips are great and we'd love to hear more about your family's recent RV trip!

Thanks in advance for sharing with us!
Reply With Quote

  #6  
Old 08-09-2010, 10:13 AM
RandyP RandyP is offline
Family Adventurer
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 15
Default

We embarked on the 18 day journey from Forest City, Iowa in a brand new 32 foot RV and set a course for the Black Hills of South Dakota. We made a stop at the Badlands (where it was snowing in May - that was weird). On our second night we parked at Mt. Rushmore, whipped up a quick dinner and headed out to explore in the glow of the moonlight. This whole area would prove to offer something for the entire family. We spent part of the next day at Custer State Park, then stopped at this cool area where gravity is turned upside down (our son was a bit freaked out) before ending at Old MacDonald's Farm. It was absolutely precious as we pulled into the parking lot and our son screamed - we're here, we're here!

The next day we headed out into the vast nothingness of Montana, stopping at Wall Drug - in Wall, SD on the way. The next couple of days would see our campground as the highlight of the day. We always tried to choose a campground with something for our son, like a playground or at least space to run and play. We crossed the border into Canada and decided on a route through Banff and Jasper. The views were spectacular and we had several lazy days that included hiking, hot springs and wildlife viewing.

Now was the hard part - long days driving through the North of Alberta province into British Columbia and then on to the Yukon. This is the famed Alaska Highway...incredible views, vast stretches with nothing in sight and an interesting driving experience (often washboard dirt road) in a 32' rig. Our first real stop was Whitehorse, Yukon. There are several museums in town and the famed USS Klondike - a paddlewheeler that used to troll the Yukon River. Back on the open road, the next stretch was the most desolate.

Again, the key was finding small roadside attractions and interesting campgrounds. Once we pulled into Alaska, we were in the home stretch and the ride up to Anchorage was quick (relative to our 2500 miles thus far). One of the highlights of Anchorage was the weekend market where we wore jackets and the native Alaskans were wearing short sleeve t-shirts...perspective.

If anyone has specific questions, I'm happy to answer them. Conveying the spectacular nature of such a trip is often difficult to do in words.
Reply With Quote

  #7  
Old 08-09-2010, 03:33 PM
HostColleen's Avatar
HostColleen HostColleen is offline
Host & Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 481
Thumbs up

Thanks so much for the wonderful details Randy! I imagined it would be somewhat adventurous and that there'd have been some amazing stops and views along the way - that's a good load of driving that was done, covering a lot of America and into some lovely parts of Canada as well before hitting Alaska! Hard to imagine that big rig on a dirt road though - I'm sure it has great driving features but still, a dirt road and an RV? Kudos for that!

Funny about the Alaskans out with short sleeves and you're all covered up - I guess it's true and no matter what, one really does adjust to one's surroundings and it becomes "normal" to them. When I climbed a glacier in New Zealand, our guide was wearing shorts. On the first part of the climb, the mountain part that got us over to the glacier - well she was aptly dressed and we were all HOT with our clothes on, peeling them off as we climbed but then we hit the glacier, began to climb that and of course, it was FREEZING and we quickly suited back up and continued to shudder, all the way up to the top, where it was like sub-zero. Try to keep warm and from falling into crevasses and realize what you've just done while your mind is numb - not easy!! And all the while, the guide is just standing there in her shorts.......oh and she never bothered to tell us about watching for the crevasses, we had to figure that out on our own. LOL. So I guess "cold" is relative to everyone, as is the other extreme, heat. It's all part of the discovery and wonder of travel!!

So thankful that you shared your Road Trip stories with us and yes, emotions and feelings of seeing things are indeed difficult to put into words, I know. But you gave us a great description of your itinerary, what you saw and did and we thank you so very much! Our travel community thrives on stories like yours We are glad you had a safe, wonderful, exciting trip!

What's next???
Reply With Quote

  #8  
Old 08-10-2010, 09:44 AM
RandyP RandyP is offline
Family Adventurer
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HostColleen View Post

Funny about the Alaskans out with short sleeves and you're all covered up - I guess it's true and no matter what, one really does adjust to one's surroundings and it becomes "normal" to them. When I climbed a glacier in New Zealand, our guide was wearing shorts. On the first part of the climb, the mountain part that got us over to the glacier - well she was aptly dressed and we were all HOT with our clothes on, peeling them off as we climbed but then we hit the glacier, began to climb that and of course, it was FREEZING and we quickly suited back up and continued to shudder, all the way up to the top, where it was like sub-zero. Try to keep warm and from falling into crevasses and realize what you've just done while your mind is numb - not easy!! And all the while, the guide is just standing there in her shorts.......oh and she never bothered to tell us about watching for the crevasses, we had to figure that out on our own. LOL. So I guess "cold" is relative to everyone, as is the other extreme, heat. It's all part of the discovery and wonder of travel!!

What's next???
Great story...it all is a matter of persepctive. This year we were supposed to go back for a 3 week RV trip in Alaksa, up the Dalton and hit some remote spots we haven't been, but that has been pushed to next summer. Hopefully I will be back on the road this spring doing student educational tours...that is always an adventure!
Reply With Quote

  #9  
Old 08-10-2010, 09:09 PM
HostColleen's Avatar
HostColleen HostColleen is offline
Host & Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 481
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyP View Post
Great story...it all is a matter of persepctive. This year we were supposed to go back for a 3 week RV trip in Alaksa, up the Dalton and hit some remote spots we haven't been, but that has been pushed to next summer. Hopefully I will be back on the road this spring doing student educational tours...that is always an adventure!
It's great to know you've got another Alaska adventure coming up next summer, how exciting is that? I've yet to get there once yet! Hoping to though, it's on my "dream list" and so, with any luck.......

The studen educational trips sound like an adventure indeed. What ages and do you go far? Day trips? How many in one bunch? Do you micro-chip them? I'd be so nervous with that many kids out on a trip these days!!
However, it sounds like you must be experienced at this and I'm NOT so you surely have a grip on it all, I'm thinking, so long as the kids co-operate!!

And then not long after those trips, ALASKA for 3 weeks!! Yeah Yeah!
Reply With Quote

  #10  
Old 08-10-2010, 09:29 PM
RandyP RandyP is offline
Family Adventurer
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 15
Default

We've been to Alaska 5 times and you totally have to go! When you take the plunge, make sure that you have at least 2 weeks - it is one of the most amazing places on earth!

Yeah, student tours present their own challenge. They typically run 3-8 days and are mostly East Coast, Wash DC, Philadelphia, Williamsburg, NYC, Boston, etc. Groups range from 10-50 kids, but sometimes we have multi-bus trips or several groups on one bus. The best ages are 10-13. I've led high school groups too, but they're definitely tougher to engage. As far as tracking, we barcode them as they step off the plane...just kidding. Keeping the group together is the biggest challenge, especially when you have 50 kids at the monuments, at night. It is stressful at times, but really a lot of fun.
Reply With Quote


Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:16 PM.


2009 - 2014, The Independent Traveler, Inc. All rights reserved. All of the material contained on Family Vacation Critic is protected under copyright. You may, however, download a single copy for your personal use.